Salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity. Book review: Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity 2019-02-27

Salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity Rating: 8,8/10 1487 reviews

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salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

Salafism is not a single phenomenon, although it is often treated as a unified movement with branches emerging in many countries. Over the last decade or so Salafism has become one of the West's new political bogey-men. Salafī -Orientation in Sudanese Mahdism. Prospects for Peace in Yemen The civil war in Yemen has been ongoing since 2014 and the war has led to a severe humanitarian crisis. Building on four years spent in Yemen, his research focuses primarily on the development of the contemporary Salafi movement in the Arabian Peninsula.

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Prospects for Peace in Yemen

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

The Salafi movement emerged into a turbulent age, and social and political changes have led to religious identity becoming an increasingly contested arena in Yemen. While this counter-narrative may seem quite evident to the anthropologists and historians upon whose work and methodologies Bonnefoy draws, it appears to remain a necessary corrective with regard to a much-maligned movement like Salafism and a much-stereotyped region like the Arabian Peninsula. People engage with neighboring regions, traders passing through, and national governments as well as the various efforts to challenge them in a range of social and religious fields. He is a researcher in political science at the Institut Francais du Proche-Orient based in the Palestinian Territories. Lebanese Salafis between the Gulf and Europe: Development, Fractionalization and Transnational Networks of Salafism in Lebanon. Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity.

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Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

This article deals with the prominent contemporary Jihadi-Salafi ideologue Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi. This movement claims that the uprising is not internally motivated, but rather an external event manipulated by foreign powers. Indeed, Bonnefoy details how Salafi actors do the same as they reappropriate Yemeni historical figures and traditional practices in their competition with Zaydis and Sufis to be considered the most authentic and endogenous movement. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2013. Deol, Jeevan, and Zaheer Kazmi, eds. Although this article does not focus on explaining al-Maqdisi's popularity, it seems obvious that his specific combination of purist and jihadi Salafism may account for at least some of his standing among Salafis.

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Book review: Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. Reformist Voices of Islam: Mediating Islam and Modernity. Writing largely in response to and yet critical of an international relations theory framework, Bonnefoy thus argues against a state-centered approach to transnational relations which obscures not only the relevance of individual actors but also the very interpenetration and diversity of transnational religious and political movements. Dar al-Hadith continues to be a major centre of Salafi learning in Yemen, with many hundreds of students a year passing through its doors. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1986. Radical Islam and the Revival of Medieval Theology.

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Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

The Salafi movement emerged into a turbulent age, and social and political changes have led to religious identity becoming an increasingly contested arena in Yemen. It still remains to be seen what the Stockholm peace talks in December will bring to this multi-layered conflict, which has domestic, regional and global superpowers as key stakeholders. While the emergence of Salafism in Yemen no doubt belongs to a regional, even global trend for religious revival movements — prompted by such forces of modernisation as increased literacy rates, the influence of mass media and the individualisation of religious practice — it is also clearly rooted in the Yemeni political and religious context. The anthropologist Gabriele vom Bruck has written extensively on Zaydi communities and her recent article Regimes of Piety Revisited: Zaydi Political Moralities in Republican Yemen 2010 offers a useful description of the changes Zaydism has undergone since 1962. The growth of the Salafi movement has been both a cause and consequence of social upheavals. A Fundamental Quest: Hizb al-Tahrir and the Search for the Islamic Caliphate. Skovgaard-Petersen, Jakob, and Bettina Gräf, eds.

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Prospects for Peace in Yemen

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

The work is remarkable for its depth of knowledge about various strands of the movement in Yemen, but it also draws out important patterns concerning the interaction of state and non-state actors, the diffusion of ideas, and how perceptions of the local and the foreign can play out politically in diverse locales and transnational discourses. Revolt against Modernity: Muslim Zealots and the West. This was no small feat. Jihad in the West: The Rise of Militant Salafism. These and other questions were discussed among the distinguished panelists: Alia Eshaq, Political Analyst at Pitchn, previously at Berghof Foundation and International Crisis Group, with experience from peace negotiations in Yemen.

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Salafism in Yemen

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

Religious Perspectives on Terrorism, vol. Pérouse de Montclos, Marc-Antoine, ed. The Making of Salafism: Islamic Reform in the Twentieth Century. Al- Shawkani rejected several key tenets of Zaydism — including that of khuruj — but was patronised by the Qasimi dynasty of Zaydi imams who ruled in Yemen from the 17th to the 19th century. Although several scholars, research c.

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Reading : Salafism In Yemen Transnationalism And Religious Identity

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

Bonnefoy starts, instead, by describing the history and geographic dynamics of the border between Yemen and Saudi Arabia. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2017. This books is essential reading for those interested in Yemeni politics or Salafi movements more generally, but it should also find a place in broader debates about Islamist movements, discourses, and ideas. Many regard the movement as the antechamber of violent groups such as al-Qaeda, and as the by-product of a centralized foreign-policy platform shaped by so-called Saudi interests. This ethnographic component allows him to shift between macro- and microlevel analysis in ways that enrich his arguments enormously.

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Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity by Laurent Bonnefoy

salafism in yemen transnationalism and religious identity

Book review: Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity The British-Yemeni Society Book review Salafism in Yemen: Transnationalism and Religious Identity by Laurent Bonnefoy, C. The growth of the Salafi movement has been both a cause and consequence of social upheavals. In the midst of this conflict stands the Yemeni people which is suffering from starvation and epidemic diseases. The Prophet and Pharaoh: Muslim Extremism in Egypt. Leiden: African Studies Centre, 2014. In its beginning, Salafism in Yemen was quietist in nature, with Salafi leaders and activists retreating from worldly affairs, most notably from participation in politics.

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