After identity mennonite writing in north america. After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America Edited by Robert Zacharias 2019-02-07

After identity mennonite writing in north america Rating: 6,6/10 1457 reviews

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after identity mennonite writing in north america

Occasionally, she'll knit one, and as she knits and purls, the yarn flows as a river through a valley. After Identity is a collection of essays edited by Robert Zacharias, assistant professor of English at York University, Toronto. The personal story serves the larger world. We have pulled up stakes on the settled question of identity and are responsible now to hear and speak the good news wherever we find ourselves responding in ways that keep us all accountable beyond our own agendas, perspectives, and prejudices; beyond our own identities, willing to consider communions and creations after identity. Although ethnic identity plays a role, it shrinks beside the larger concerns with suffering and death that are applicable to all of society and humanity. We need to listen outside the church because those voices were rejected or even abused inside the church.

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after identity mennonite writing in north america

The six essays in this section search for new roots from which Mennonite writing might sprout. Referring back to my own experience in relation to the Mennonite obligation to choose the emphasis for many who have suffered abuse in the church shifts onto obligation. Fittingly, as the editor of this volume, Zacharias also contributes the meta-critical commentary on the collection. Along with the editor, the contributors include Ervin Beck, Di Brandt, Daniel Shank Cruz, Jeff Gundy, Ann Hostetler, Julia Spicher Kasdorf, Royden Loewen, Jesse Nathan, Magdalene Redekop, Hildi Froese Tiessen, and Paul Tiessen. But after a failed run at academia I began looking into pastoral ministry. Have we stopped to consider that some of these authors were largely critiquing modernity in Mennonite dress? The collection of essays in this volume engages the question of what Mennonite writing might be when it is detached from its moorings in identity. After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America.

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After Identity: Reflections

after identity mennonite writing in north america

His overview of the conundrum of identity politics in Asian American studies suggests that the field has widely acknowledged the superficiality of its identitarian frame yet continues to insist on its ongoing value in mobilizing collective agency and antiracist action. The question of the possibility of inherited trauma and suffering through shared ethnic memory is still there, but the more urgent and important concern is the care provided by the mental health system for all who suffer. Rather than agonize over this ambiguity, Zacharias embraces it, offering both theoretical and commonsensical rationale for such response. My parents were regular but not devote attendees. Such are the tensions, paradoxes and the necessary contingency of being Mennonite.

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After identity : Mennonite writing in North America in SearchWorks catalog

after identity mennonite writing in north america

Although the arguments offered are thought provoking, it remains unclear whether. After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America is an interrogation of this prolonged preoccupation and an exploration of the potential for a move beyond it--to a truly post-identity Mennonite literature. After reflecting on my own journey and engaging these authors I am encouraged that the question of identity does not lead necessarily to narcissistic abstraction or fixed boundary marking. So the voices and conversation in After Identity are important to the church because our notion of being Mennonite for those of us engaged in church processes is not in our control and it would be irresponsible and perhaps unfaithful not to listen, not pay attention to those working outside our shifting parameters; not that we always need to agree we never do. There are roughly 500,000 baptized members of Mennonite churches in North America, scattered broadly across some 150 different groups and denominations. After Identity does not attempt to offer simplistic answers to these questions, but it does a superb job of mining the multiple issues that confront the field of Mennonite literature as it attempts to define itself. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 2004.

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The future of the Mennonite Church After Identity: A review essay

after identity mennonite writing in north america

Then at the beginning of my university teaching career in the early 1990s, I taught Blue Mountains of China in a team-taught Canadian prose course at Trent University. The good news is that there are meticulous and energetic individuals engaged in examining and exploring Mennonite identity well beyond the walls and processes of Mennonite churches and denominations. The novel was all about identity—an identity that stressed otherness and difference in its presentation to the reader. Night after night, my mother's hands work the fibre, back and forth, the yarn's. Jan Schroeder and Margaret Steffler reflect on After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America Penn State University Press 2015; University of Manitoba Press, 2016 and Connie Braun probes the ways in which stories of a community and faith are articulated and passed down or not to future generations in a memoir essay and poems. What this means for the future of Mennonite literature and its attendant criticism is the question at the heart of this volume.

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After identity : Mennonite writing in North America (eBook, 2015) [commissarylounge.com]

after identity mennonite writing in north america

I thus studied and taught Blue Mountains with an emphasis on the elements it shared with other diasporic texts in the Canadian multicultural canon of the time. I offer this brief confessional as an initial response to reading and reflecting on the collection of essays in After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America edited by Robert Zacharias. © 2003 - 2019 - provozovatelé elektronického obchodu. The twelve essays collected here view Mennonite writing as transitioning beyond a tradition concerned primarily with defining itself and its cultural milieu. In the winter evenings when the sunlight has faded, my mother crochets an afghan. The shifting position of Mennonite literature in Canadian criticism, in which the conversation on cultural difference moved from ethnicity to race in the 1990s, helps to make clear what is at stake. Podle zákona o evidenci tržeb je prodávající povinen vystavit kupujícímu úètenku.

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The Noise of Identity: Turning to Attentiveness and the Receptive Ear

after identity mennonite writing in north america

This is not to say that such themes are not mentioned, but that the ways in which they are brought into the discussion often do not extend much beyond generalities, side-swipes, too-vague notions about Jesus, or unsubstantiated claims about what is or is not said and done within church and theological circles. Contributors explore the histories and contexts--as well as the gaps--that have informed and diverted the perennial focus on identity in Mennonite literature, even as that identity is reread, reframed, and expanded. After Identity interrogates this prolonged preoccupation and explores the potential to move beyond it to a truly post-identity Mennonite literature. A four-day symposium in Pennsylvania in 2013 discussing the role of identity in Mennonite writing was the stimulus for this collection of essays. This is what follows from the rejection of both the pope and infant baptism. Post-identity marks the breakdown of this grammar and unfolds as an inherent and integral dimension of identitarian thinking. Identity has, however, been an important anchor and springboard for much of the writings of the last thirty-five years.

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Reading : After Identity Mennonite Writing In North America

after identity mennonite writing in north america

Can Mennonites and the Mennonite church the church being a sort of spectre haunting these essays hear the message s offered? She notes how one element of Mennonite identity has precisely been the policing of identity. Although the history, form, and function of Asian North American studies are clearly incommensurable with Mennonite North American studies, the larger scholarly context outlined in Semblance of Identity and Beyond Autoethnography—in which scholars of minoritized literary traditions search for ways to build on earlier identity-based critical studies while taking seriously their limitations—offers an apt description of how and why scholars of Mennonite writing are currently working to reconsider their own field. What this means for the future of Mennonite literature and its attendant criticism is the question at the heart of these essays. Born is professor of English at Bethel College. Then a rolling field in soft shades of sage, or wheat and rye.

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